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Brighton High School

(303) 655-4200

270 S 8th Ave
Brighton, CO 80601

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Let's Go Pink

December 1, 2016

 

Breast Cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women all around the world, with around 246,660 new cases of invasive breast cancer diagnosed each year. One in every eight women in the US is diagnosed with breast cancer. It is also the second leading cause of death among women with cancer. Forty thousand four hundred fifty women dying of it every year.

 

“My Mom was diagnosed with breast cancer when I was 16. It truly affected my whole family in a negative way at first, but over time it brought us together. My Mom’s diagnosis has changed me forever. I love and respect her so much more and am closer to her now than I ever thought possible. Advice I would give people around someone battling cancer would be to love them and give them attention. This is a special struggle and no one can do it alone,” said Marshall King (Psychology Teacher).

 

There are over 2.8 million breast cancer survivors in the US today. Those survivors are celebrated every day in October as it is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Many different organizations schedule events around this

time.

 

“When I found out my cousin had breast cancer, I was very scared along with my entire family. I was 11 at the time and my cousin and I were pretty close. My family was also worried that the cancer was genetic, which it was, and thankfully she has beaten it,” said Alex Maestas (‘20).

 

Only about 5-10% of those diagnosed with breast cancer are thought to be inherited. That means the cancer is caused by dysfunctional genes passed from parents to their children. Most of these cases of inherited breast cancer are associated with two abnormal genes, BRCA1 (Breast cancer gene one) and BRCA2 (Breast cancer gene two) which everyone has. They are used to repair cell damage and keep breast, ovarian, and other cells growing at a normal rate.

 

“A family friend of my mother and I, got diagnosed when I was pretty young and one day she left without me getting to say goodbye. I used to celebrate Breast Cancer Awareness month but not anymore due to me not being in sports which is where it was celebrated mostly,” said Angelina Ostrum (’20).

 

Breast cancer affects millions of women across the globe every year along with their families. The survivors from these cases are barley ever celebrated by other people outside their family. Donate to ( http://www.cancerresearch.org/giving-to-cri ) to find a cure for breast cancer patients and also their families.

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